Hypalon Roof Challenges in Florida

By Rick Brown • July 15th, 2012

Approximately 25 years ago, and as an adjunct to its use as a reservoir and pond liner, DuPont introduced Hypalon as a roof membrane. The rationale was its’ superb resistance to chemicals and long-life in harsh environments made it an excellent candidate for a roof system.

Hypalon is synthetic rubber and is chemically formulated as chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE). As a roof membrane, Hypalon is welded with hot air as a thermoplastic. Subsequent to installation and environmental exposure, the membrane’s components cross link to form a synthetic rubber material. The membrane is dimensionally stable to +/- 0.1% after cure and has reflectivity and emissive ratings of .85 and .87 respectively. White Stevens Hypalon membranes meet the EPA Energy Star Roof Products requirements and are California Title 24 compliant.

Hypalon membranes are installed in a variety of fashions, however, the primary methods are fully adhered and mechanically attached. Because of its’ impervious nature to most chemicals, Hypalon is available as a direct installation over the following roof systems:

  • Smooth surfaced, aged coal tar pitch and built-up asphalt
  • CPE
  • EPDM
  • Modified bitumen

Additionally, Stevens Hypalon has wind ratings ranging from 1-90 for mechanically attached to 1-270 for fully adhered and has both UL and Factory Mutual Class A fire ratings.

Several issues over the years have caused the Hypalon market share to decrease dramatically. Foremost is the growth of red algae on the membrane surface prior to complete cure. Red algae causes human health concerns and promotes other vegetative growth which ultimately destroys the membranes watertight integrity. The secondary problem with Hypalon membranes is “chalking and cracking” caused by UV exposure. This chalking leaves the membrane in an almost irreparable state necessitating the development of special primers and dual installation to install a patch or repair a seam. The final issue is that of shrinkage, more prevalent in the non-reinforced membranes. Stevens attempted a change in formulation in the late’80s to address these issues, however, it was relatively unsuccessful and with the advent of other PVC and TPO hybrids, the market appears to have moved on.

SRC stocks Hypalon membranes and primers required for repairs. If your Hypalon roof needs maintenance or corrective measures, please feel free to contact us.

Format

Approximately 25 years ago, and as an adjunct to its use as a reservoir and pond liner, DuPont introduced Hypalon as a roof membrane. The rationale was its’ superb resistance to chemicals and long-life in harsh environments made it an excellent candidate for a roof system.

Hypalon is synthetic rubber and is chemically formulated as chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSPE). As a roof membrane, Hypalon is welded with hot air as a thermoplastic. Subsequent to installation and environmental exposure, the membrane’s components cross link to form a synthetic rubber material. The membrane is dimensionally stable to +/- 0.1% after cure and has reflectivity and emissive ratings of .85 and .87 respectively. White Stevens Hypalon membranes meet the EPA Energy Star Roof Products requirements and are California Title 24 compliant.

Hypalon membranes are installed in a variety of fashions, however, the primary methods are fully adhered and mechanically attached. Because of its’ impervious nature to most chemicals, Hypalon is available as a direct installation over the following roof systems:

  • Smooth surfaced, aged coal tar pitch and built-up asphalt
  • CPE
  • EPDM
  • Modified bitumen

Additionally, Stevens Hypalon has wind ratings ranging from 1-90 for mechanically attached to 1-270 for fully adhered and has both UL and Factory Mutual Class A fire ratings.

Several issues over the years have caused the Hypalon market share to decrease dramatically. Foremost is the growth of red algae on the membrane surface prior to complete cure. Red algae causes human health concerns and promotes other vegetative growth which ultimately destroys the membranes watertight integrity. The secondary problem with Hypalon membranes is “chalking and cracking” caused by UV exposure. This chalking leaves the membrane in an almost irreparable state necessitating the development of special primers and dual installation to install a patch or repair a seam. The final issue is that of shrinkage, more prevalent in the non-reinforced membranes. Stevens attempted a change in formulation in the late’80s to address these issues, however, it was relatively unsuccessful and with the advent of other PVC and TPO hybrids, the market appears to have moved on.

SRC stocks Hypalon membranes and primers required for repairs. If your Hypalon roof needs maintenance or corrective measures, please feel free to contact us..

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